Interview | Dorian: “The festival is the most popular democratic demonstration”



Barcelona band durian On Friday arrives in Valencia to perform Deleste’s opening day, Firstly festival Urban the season, where he will share the bill with Leon Benavente and the Valencia Raiders. Mark Gilley is caught in the interview “working on several fronts (new album, preparing to tour Latin America, ‘Something Incredible’ at Liceu) but he’s happy. Last year, Dorian released ‘Ritual,’ an album they kicked off New voices, new collaborations, and more social themes.

Was the openness a personal need or a market need?No no, Going behind the market is a huge mistake. What we’re after is art, surprising ourselves, and continuing to play with music. One of the premises we had when doing Ritual was collaborating with artists not from our scene to learn new ways of crafting, writing verses, and working in the studio. Expand our creative horizon, which is represented by Pimp Flaco, Lido Pimienta, Ana Mena, Alizzz & mldr;

With Alizzz they sing this thing about “You haven’t set foot on a festival in over a thousand years”.Yes, it is for those friends or relatives that we all have, after a certain age, consider that they already know everything and that they have seen it all and lived it all and who have been kidnapped by the magnetic force of the sofa. They stop experiencing life which is why they give off that weird energy that the song says.

But, is it too bad not to step into a festival?Yes, I think it’s bad. Festivals will always put a possibility in front of you Meet new people and artists It will get you out of your boxes. This is always better than going for a shot or not leaving the house. It is always better to go to a festival than not to go.

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What does the Ritual Festival contain?Festivals are company rites, places where we meet different social classes, races and environments. To me, in the modern world, the festival is the highest manifestation of popular democracy in existence. It is a celebration of life, that we are here to jump together and have fun together. This was born with the hippie world, making love and enjoying music together, I guess they haven’t changed much since then. They open minds, release energy, and create a sense of community.

We’ve all been ridiculed and laughed at at some point, whether we’re straight, bisexual, gay, or whatever.

These messages from now on corruptionor improvement or feminism Do they reach the audience that goes to the festival?Yes they come, yes. “Duo”, for example, talks about duality and not knowing how people sing this song. Not because they feel identified with duality, but because it speaks to everyone’s right to do whatever they want with their lives. And since we’ve all been ridiculed and laughed at at some point, whether we’re bisexual or gay or whatever, we all feel identified with the energy of this song’s hero. People aren’t stupid and the fact that you’re at a festival surrounded by a lot of people doesn’t mean you don’t pay attention to what comes off the stage. So it will always be better to say interesting things rather than trivialities.

Are the new generations more open to this kind of message than you are?I don’t feel qualified to put people in a bag in general. I would just tell you that in all generations there is a proportion of people who are more open and militant towards politics or social justice, and others who are indifferent or directly opposed to it. I think this happens in all generations.In “Ciudad subterranean” (2009), Dorian’s most famous album, there were already songs with a social touch, such as “La Mañana Herida”, “Estudios de Mercado” or “La tormenta de arena” that spoke in a very clear way about drugs.Our music is trying to be a call to rebellion, to reach a listener who is dissatisfied with the family and social environment he has touched. And this runs through some of the songs that range from existentialism to anger and rejection of what it’s supposed to be. It’s in our DNA.

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mates generation

How do you live with those huge hymns to you like “La tormenta de arena” or “Anywhere Else” that are over a decade old? Wasn’t it heavy?I still feel reflected in those songs, I don’t know if I changed a little bit or they had something timeless in them. We still really enjoy playing with them and it’s amazing how many youngsters they reach. We live in a time of turbo-capitalist dynamism where every new song that arrives destroys the previous one. If within that dynamic you have songs that have been in the spotlight for over a decade, that’s a massive privilege.

Our music is trying to be a call to rebellion, to reach a listener who is dissatisfied with the family and social environment he has touched.

And how do you live with your fellow generation, Myers, Vitosta, lesbians, Saida, who, like you, now preside over the festival’s billboards? Wasn’t it heavy for you?I feel part of and proud of this generation that, since independence, has kicked the table of the Spanish music industry and reached the top without the help of the big communication lobby and against the canons of the music industry of the moment. And I’m proud we’re still out there, enjoying the craft without falling apart or getting lost along the way.

What does being independent now mean to you?You assume one hundred percent sovereignty over the music, managing aspects of your artistic life, what sound you’re going to develop on your next album, where you’re going to tour… That’s what independent is, whether you’re on a “major” label or not.

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All of which you can do if you are a successful indie player. but…Of course, in the end the audience has the final say. Nirvana sold millions of records while on a multinational label with work as an anti-commercial as “In utero”. Let’s see who tells them they weren’t carrots. We all know brilliant artists who still aren’t successful and others who aren’t very successful, but because they’re prettier or whatever, they do.

It took a lot of us for a certain audience and some of the press to take us seriously

And what does it mean to be an electronic music artist? Not so long ago that in Spain was not so well visible.When we started with Dorian, it was sacrilege for us to be a band that mixed guitars, synths, and programmed bases. It was very difficult for us to take seriously some of the music press and certain segments of the audience. Fortunately, people’s ears have opened and we can already tell that the audience is now very open musically. But we do remember how difficult it was for groups like us who were not from one world or the other but from both at the same time.

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