Emilia Clarke says parts of her brain are ‘missing’ after aneurysms

emilia-clarke-says-parts-of-her-brain-are-missing-after-aneurysms

Emilia Clarke says she had “the most excruciating pain” after suffering two brain aneurysms, but is grateful for both her recovery and for working on “Game of Thrones” at the time.

“It was incredibly helpful to have ‘Game of Thrones’ sweep me up and give me that purpose,” she said during an interview with BBC’s “Sunday Morning.”

The actress suffered the life-threatening aneurysms in 2011 and 2013 and said that when it comes to her brain now, “there’s quite a bit missing.”

“Strokes, basically, as soon as any part of your brain doesn’t get blood for a second it’s gone,” Clarke said. “So the blood finds a different route to get around, but then whatever bit is missing is therefore gone.”

She also said with the amount of her brain that is no longer usable, “it’s remarkable that I am able to speak, sometimes articulately, and live my life completely normally with absolutely no repercussions. I am in the really, really, really small minority of people that can survive that.”

Clarke, who played Daenerys Targaryen on the hit HBO series, is currently starring in the play “The Seagull” in London’s West End.

HBO is owned by CNN’s parent company.

Emilia Clarke gives update after surviving 2 brain aneurysms: ‘Quite a bit missing’

The former “Game of Thrones’ star said a scan of her brain showed that “quite a bit” of it was “missing.”

Emilia Clarke said she is grateful that the two brain aneurysms she suffered in her 20s haven’t stripped her of her ability to live a normal life.

The former “Game of Thrones” star, 35, told BBC One’s “Sunday Morning” that she feels lucky to be able to communicate after experiencing the aneurysms, which happened while she was a cast member on the Emmy-winning HBO drama.

“The amount of my brain that is no longer usable — it’s remarkable that I am able to speak, sometimes articulately, and live my life completely normally with absolutely no repercussions,” Clarke said in a video excerpt from the interview published by Metro.

“I am in the really, really, really small minority of people that can survive that,” she added.

Clarke said a subsequent scan of her brain showed that “quite a bit” of it was “missing … which always makes me laugh.”

“Strokes, basically, as soon as any part of your brain doesn’t get blood for a second, it’s gone,” she continued. “And so the blood finds a quicker, a different route to get around but then whatever bit it’s missing is therefore gone.”

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A brain aneurysm is a bulge in the wall of an artery. If it grows large, it can burst and cause life-threatening bleeding, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Brain aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, affect 3% to 5% of the population, the American Heart Association noted. A ruptured brain aneurysm can cause a type of stroke known as a subarachnoid hemorrhage, according to Mayo Clinic, which is what Clarke experienced.

Clarke described her medical ordeal in a 2019 essay she wrote for The New Yorker.

The actor revealed that the first brain aneurysm happened in February 2011 after Season One of “Game of Thrones” wrapped. Clarke, then 24, was working out with a trainer when she experienced a painful sensation in her brain.

“My trainer had me get into the plank position and I immediately felt as though an elastic band were squeezing my brain,” she wrote. “Somehow, almost crawling, I made it to the locker room. I reached the toilet, sank to my knees and proceeded to be violently, voluminously ill. Meanwhile, the pain — shooting, stabbing, constricting pain — was getting worse. At some level, I knew what was happening — my brain was damaged.”

After being taken to a hospital, Clarke was diagnosed with subarachnoid hemorrhage and underwent an emergency three-hour surgery.

After the procedure, she experienced excruciating pain, vision problems and aphasia, a condition where damage to the brain affects a person’s ability to speak and write. Clarke recalled that at one point she couldn’t remember her own name.

“In my worst moments, I wanted to pull the plug,” she wrote. “I asked the medical staff to let me die.”

While healing in the hospital over the next month, Clarke learned she had another smaller aneurysm on the other side of her brain. Doctors told her it could remain dormant and harmless for the rest of her life. They advised keeping a “careful watch” on it.

But in 2013, while Clarke was in a play on Broadway, the actor, who had only five days remaining on her Screen Actors Guild insurance, underwent a brain scan that revealed the growth in her brain had doubled in size. Clarke underwent a procedure to treat it but experienced complications.

“When they woke me, I was screaming in pain,” Clarke wrote. “The procedure had failed. I had a massive bleed and the doctors made it plain that my chances of surviving were precarious if they didn’t operate again. This time they needed to access my brain in the old-fashioned way — through my skull.”

Her recovery from the second surgery was even more difficult than the first. “I emerged from the operation with a drain coming out of my head. Bits of my skull had been replaced by titanium,” wrote the star, who also recalled experiencing debilitating panic and anxiety attacks in the hospital.

Eventually, she recovered and now lives a normal life.

“In the years since my second surgery I have healed beyond my most unreasonable hopes,” she wrote. “I am now at a hundred per cent.”

Emilia Clarke Says Two Aneurysms Left Part of Her Brain “Missing”

“It’s remarkable that I’m able to speak,” the ‘Game of Thrones’ actress said during a BBC interview on Sunday.

Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke has opened up about the impact on her brain, life and acting career from enduring two life-threatening aneurysms.

“It’s remarkable that I’m able to speak, sometimes articulately, and live my life completely normally without absolutely no repercussions,” Clarke said during an appearance on BBC’s Sunday Morning program. “I am in the really, really, really small minority of people that can survive that,” Clarke added about her resiliency.

In 2019, Clarke first revealed that she has survived two aneurysms in an essay for The New Yorker, as she indicated the health scares began just after the success of the first season of Game of Thrones. On Sunday, the HBO series star added that the aneurysms, essentially strokes, eliminated portions of her brain as revealed by a scan.

“There’s quite a bit missing, which always makes me laugh. Because strokes, basically, as soon as any part of your brain doesn’t get blood for a second, it’s gone. And so the blood finds a different route to get around, but then whatever bit it’s missing is therefore gone. It shows how little of our brains we need,” Clarke explained.

Around a third of people die immediately after an aneurysm, the actress learned. Clarke had immediate brain surgery to seal off the aneurysm, an operation that put her health at great risk. She told the BBC program that her star role in Game of Thrones was helpful in giving her purpose as she recovered from the aneurysms.

And Clarke — who is currently starring in a stage production of Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull in London’s West End — added she continues to do theater because her memory has always been essential to her acting craft.

What’s more, she no longer gives thought to her dramatic brain mass loss. “It’s the brain you have, so there’s no point in racking your brain as to what might not be there, because what you have is great and let’s work with that,” Clarke said.

Watch the full interview, below.

Emilia Clarke missing ‘quite a bit’ of her brain after two aneurysms

Emilia Clarke revealed she is missing “quite a bit” of her brain after suffering two aneurysms during her time on “Game of Thrones.”

“The amount of my brain that is no longer usable — it’s remarkable that I am able to speak, sometimes articulately, and live my life completely normally with absolutely no repercussions,” the 35-year-old actress said on BBC One’s “Sunday Morning.”

“I am in the really, really, really small minority of people that can survive that,” she added. “There’s quite a bit missing! Which always makes me laugh. Because strokes, basically, as soon as any part of your brain doesn’t get blood for a second, it’s gone. And so the blood finds a different route to get around, but then whatever bit it’s missing is therefore gone.”

Just after she finished filming the critically acclaimed HBO show’s first season in 2011, Clarke suffered her first aneurysm, which also led to a stroke and a subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Due to the health scare, the “Solo: A Star Wars Story” star had to undergo brain surgery that resulted in her being unable to remember her name.

“I was suffering from a condition called aphasia, a consequence of the trauma my brain had suffered,” she wrote in a 2019 essay for The New Yorker.

“In my worst moments, I wanted to pull the plug,” she continued. “I asked the medical staff to let me die. My job — my entire dream of what my life would be — centered on language, on communication. Without that, I was lost.”

After fighting through these dark moments, Clarke was able to come out on the other side since the aphasia was temporary.

“I was sent back to the ICU, and after about a week, the aphasia passed,” she wrote. “I was able to speak.”

But in 2013, the “Me Before You” star was faced with another aneurism that needed to be treated through surgery.

Although she was “promised a relatively simple operation,” Clarke said the second was even more harrowing than the first.

“When they woke me, I was screaming in pain. The procedure had failed. I had a massive bleed and the doctors made it plain that my chances of surviving were precarious if they didn’t operate again,” she recalled in the essay.

After making a full recovery, Clarke decided to use her platform to help others who suffered similar experiences. She launched the charity SameYou to raise money for brain injury survivors and their loved ones.

Emilia Clarke’s Net Worth Proves She’s Doing Just Fine After ‘Game of Thrones’

Actress Emilia Clarke secured her breakout role in Game of Thrones as Daenerys Targaryen in April 2011. For eight seasons, she captivated audiences with her portrayal of the powerful Khaleesi and warrior. Since becoming famous, Emilia has also spoken out about the battles she faced off the screen.

In 2019, she shared that she suffered from two brain aneurysms while filming the first few seasons of Game of Thrones. Emilia said the aneurysms caused her to have pieces of her brain missing, though she could still recite her lines from the scripts and remained on the show until its series finale on May 19, 2019.

Following GOT’s ending, Emilia has been in the U.K. and is working on a new project. However, some fans might wonder how the former HBO star’s net worth looks. Fortunately, we’ve got all the details here!

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What is Emilia Clarke’s net worth?
Although she worked on BBC One’s Doctors and Syfy’s Triassic Attack in the early 2000s, Emilia’s net worth rose after she began playing Daenerys in Game of Thrones. According to Celebrity Net Worth, her fortune sits at $20 million. Most of the actress’s net worth accumulated during her time on GoT. During the show’s final two seasons, Emilia reportedly earned $1.1 million an episode and around $30 million throughout her entire run.

While the show was on hiatus, Emilia also worked on several films, including Terminator Genisys, Solo: A Star Wars Story, and Last Christmas. However, her time as Daenerys is something she knows will be discussed by fans for years to come.

While Emilia said she had made peace with her first show ending, she admitted that she doesn’t have the same memories of GoT that viewers do.

“I think it’ll take me to my 90s to be able to objectively see what Game of Thrones was because there’s just too much me in it,” she told The Hollywood Reporter in May 2021. “I have too many emotional reactions for what Emilia, herself, was experiencing at that moment in time when we were filming it … I watch a scene, and I go, ‘Oh, that was when [such and such] happened,’ which you didn’t see on screen.”

What has Emilia Clarke been up to since ‘Game of Thrones’?

Despite her no longer earning millions of dollars to film Game of Thrones, Emilia has kept herself busy with other projects. In July 2021, she debuted her first comic book, M.O.M.: Mother of Madness, which follows a single mother named Maya whose superpowers come from her menstrual cycles.

Additionally, Emilia lent her voice to 2022’s The Amazing Maurice and will be starring in the Marvel miniseries Secret Invasion for Disney Plus. Emilia also recently returned to the stage in the West End to play Nina in The Seagull (per Variety), where she’s been receiving outstanding reviews.

When she’s not filming, Emilia is also working on her charity, SameYou, which helps brain injury and stroke survivors get better recovery treatment once they leave the hospital.

“I know from personal experience that brain injury is life-changing,” the Me Before You star wrote on SameYou’s website.

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